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Hogan Business Outcome Highlights: Proof Our Science Helps Your Bottom Line

Posted by Hogan Assessments on Wed, Mar 22, 2017

There is nothing that affects an organization’s bottom line more than hiring and developing the wrong employees. In fact, a recent Huffington Post article concluded that an employee making $60,000 annually will cost his or her company between $30,000 and $45,000 to hire and onboard a replacement. That’s an incredible amount of money that could have easily been put to better use. 

At Hogan, we have collected billions of data points over the past four decades that we’ve leveraged to help companies large and small across the globe to greatly reduce turnover and positively impact their bottom line. Quite simply, it all comes down to making the right personnel decisions, and our science is the best at doing just that.

That’s why we’re pleased to release the latest Hogan Business Outcome Highlights report. This report provides 12 case studies that demonstrate the impact of Hogan’s assessments on key performance indicators. The studies examine multiple outcomes and include a wide range of jobs, organizations, and industries.

This in-depth report proves just how versatile and accurate the Hogan assessment suite really is, and how you can implement them at your organization to better predict who will excel in certain positions, and who might not be the right fit. Ultimately, it will save your organization a significant amount of money that can be invested elsewhere.

Download the Business Outcome Highlights report today.

Topics: HPI, MVPI, HDS, research, ROI, organizational success, personality assessment, organizational fit, business strategy, Hogan Assessments

Distributor Spotlight: Advanced People Strategies Developing UK's Next Generation of Leaders

Posted by Hogan Assessments on Wed, Mar 15, 2017

At a time when organizations across the globe are struggling to identify and develop the right leaders, Hogan has made it a priority to leverage decades of research to ensure all of its clients and partners are equipped with the best tools available. As a result, the Hogan Distributor Network has experienced a great deal of success against its competition, and the result is a much more effective global workforce.

A prime example of implementing a leadership development program “the Hogan way” is Hogan’s UK distributor, Advanced People Strategies (APS). Led by Managing Director Chris Humphreys, APS has more than 15 years of experience in helping organizations develop leaders both in the UK and abroad. Most recently, they spent a year assisting one of the UK’s top engineering firms with the implementation of a robust leadership development program. 

APS Case Study

Advanced People Strategies have been able to support a leading British civil engineering company over the past 12 months in the latest leadership and development program. The organization is recognized as one of the UK’s leading engineering solutions providers, and work on some of the biggest infrastructure projects within the UK.

The aim was to create a leadership pipeline for the business and to do this more objectively, removing personal biases that can come into play. The organization wanted a leadership and development program that could identify and develop candidates. Using APS’s expertise working with senior managers, APS was able to devise and support this goal with the use of the Hogan suite as part of its development centers.

APS ran five development centers which included a variety of individual and group based activities. Most of the candidates were very well established within the business although some had differing levels of experience. Using Hogan allowed the organization to add further objectivity when reviewing and selecting people for follow-up development programs.

APS supported the organization with a guided review of each participant. The Hogan Suite was used to predict potential and fit to future strategic leadership roles. These predictions were reviewed alongside the levels of skill observed on the development centers, people’s track record and references from within the organization.

The company was happy that it met its objectives to act on unbiased information when deciding the most suitable route for their people development. Whilst all the candidates were talented and well experienced within their role, the development centers enabled them to decide on who would be a best fit for strategic roles for the business going forward.

APS has since been able to provide continued support for the managers and their development, supporting them with reviewing their 360 and looking after the admin of this system.

Even in the company’s early days, Bob and Joyce Hogan always aimed to improve the global workplace through the delivery of their assessment suite. By arming talented people at organizations like APS with cutting-edge products and data, all Hogan has to do is get out of the way and they’ll handle the rest.

Topics: leadership development, future leaders, personality assessment, distributor, development

Emergence versus Effectiveness

Posted by Hogan Assessments on Tue, Mar 14, 2017

There is an old adage that cream always rises to the top. In talent management, that means people who are fit to lead an organization will rise to the corner office on their own. Although many organizations operate this way, the truth is that the best leaders rarely end up in the corner office, which is probably why half of new leaders fail.

Failed leaders can cause big problems. Leaders should drive employee engagement, yet only 30% of employees are engaged, costing the U.S. economy $550 billion a year in productivity loss. Moreover, a large global survey of employee attitudes toward management suggests that a whopping 82% of people don’t trust their boss, and over 50% of employees quit their job because of their managers.

Maybe it’s because most organizations have trouble discerning between people who are natural leaders and people who just look like natural leaders. Most organizations have trouble telling key differences between leader emergence and leader effectiveness — differences between people who emerge as high-potential candidates in organizations as a function of political skill, interpersonal savvy, and effective self-promotion skills, versus those who are effective leaders capable of building high-performing organizations, cultivating talent, and leading engaged, productive teams.

Performance reviews and supervisor nominations tend to be good at identifying the people in an organization who “look” like leaders. Emergent leaders seem smart, confident, and charismatic. They’re interpersonally savvy — talented at shaking the right hands and forming the relationships and alliances they need to advance their careers — and excellent self-promoters.

These characteristics are critical to help individuals climb the corporate ladder, and people without them are unlikely to ever play the game enough to get ahead. However, these characteristics aren’t enough to succeed at the top, which is why performance appraisals and supervisor nominations don’t work and why 46% of leaders fail to meet business objectives in a new role.

Only promoting emerging leaders means you’re missing the individuals in your organization who actually have the potential to succeed as a leader — to build and maintain a team that can outperform the competition.

Unfortunately, individuals who are great at building a team, driving business results, and managing their employees aren’t always great at managing up, which is why they often go unnoticed. Researchers spent a year studying 437 managers through observations, ratings, and assessments. They found that successful managers (in terms of pay increases and promotions) spend most of their time managing up by networking and politicking, whereas effective managers (managers with loyal, engaged teams and strong results) spend most of their time guiding subordinates and driving team performance.

Critically, these two groups only overlapped about 10% of the time, which means your organization could be leaving potentially great leaders languishing in lower management positions.

Want to know more about finding the effective high-potential employees hidden in your ranks? Check out our complimentary ebook, “The Politics of Potential”.

Topics: high potential leaders, high potential, high potential employees

Hogan to Feature Two Speakers at 2017 ATP Conference

Posted by Hogan Assessments on Wed, Mar 01, 2017

Hogan representatives Dave Winsborough, VP of Innovation and head of Hogan X, and Blaine Gaddis, Sr. Manager of Product Research, will both present at this year’s ATP Innovations in Testing Conference in Scottsdale, AZ next week. The conference, which brings assessment industry professionals together, provides a venue for attendees to learn from and collaborate.

Winsborough will facilitate a Featured Speaker Session titled “Disruption of Traditional Assessment Systems: Are We the Walking Dead?” The session will focus on how digitization has created a fundamentally different testing landscape, and how these changes have enabled significant forces that disrupt traditional assessment. Given the choice between being disruptors or being disrupted, this session also seeks to discuss which kinds of response should be taken. The session will occur at 4:30 pm on Monday, March 6.

Gaddis will participate on a panel presentation on “Psychometric Test Security Approaches to Mitigating Cheating and Faking.” In this session assessment experts within I/O Psychology and Education fields will discuss the impact of faking, psychometric approaches to detecting faking and cheating, the use of response distortion measures and analytics, and the use of both technology and “psychometric forensics” to detect cheating.

Also participating on the panel are John Jones, Kelly Dages, and Andre Allen of General Dynamics Information Technology and Joe Orban of Questar Assessment, Inc. The session will take place at 2:30 pm on Monday, March 6.

If you’re planning to attend the conference, stop by and say hello to your friends at Hogan. If you’re unable to attend, follow our updates on Facebook and Twitter.

Topics: assessment, technology, personality assessment, Hogan Assessments, Hogan, psychometrics, faking, hogan X

Distributor Spotlight: A&D Resources Helps Drive Hogan's Global Proliferation

Posted by Hogan Assessments on Thu, Feb 16, 2017

Hogan’s reputation as the global leader in personality assessment and leadership development didn’t form overnight. In the organization’s early years, Bob and Joyce Hogan knew the only way to improve the global workforce was through the use of the Hogan assessments, and that meant putting the products in the hands of those who could spread their message far and wide. What started as a daunting endeavor eventually evolved into the Hogan Distributor Network – a robust collection of the world’s finest I/O psychologists and HR practitioners spanning 60 countries.

A&D Resources, a 15-year Hogan distributor serving Denmark and the Benelux region, is a perfect example of Bob and Joyce’s original vision – empower talented people with the best personality assessments in the industry and then get out of their way. That’s exactly what A&D Founder & Managing Director Joan Jakobsen did. She is solely responsible for introducing the Danish adaptation of Hogan products, and has since built a team of extremely talented psychologists to build on that success. Her passion and drive continues to elevate the Hogan brand and develop more Hogan advocates. This was demonstrated recently in a LinkedIn post authored by Thomas Hedegaard Rasmussen, Vice President of HR Data & Analytics at Shell, who worked with Joan to implement Hogan tools at his organization.     

JJandTHR.jpg

“There is one really easy way to deliver more impact in HR. It's about being evidence-based and providing an excellent user-experience: Insist on only working with HR companies and HR products that are evidence-based and make the science easy to use - i.e. they make it a pleasure to work with stuff that actually has a proven effect. I'd like to start an evidence-based-HR-peer-to-peer-word-of-mouth recognition round by thanking Joan Jakobsen (pictured here) & A&D Resources for supporting Shell's implementation of Hogan Assessments’ Leadership 360 & Leadership Development tools (HPI, MVPI, HDS): Evidence-based, easy-to-use, to-the-point, clear edge and global benchmarks - tools that help provide excellent feedback to leaders. That is important because Leadership matters for the value companies create for employees, shareholders, and other stakeholders. If you know a great HR company with an HR product that is evidence-based and easy to use, let the rest of us know - they deserve the spotlight via some evidence-based-peer-to-peer-word-of-mouth recognition.”  

Testimonials like this are why the Hogans got into the assessment business, and why the organization remains at the forefront of the industry decades later. The company’s commitment to science and validation, coupled with a global network of partners, clients, and distributors such as A&D Resources, make Hogan the premier choice for every organization’s selection and development practices.

Topics: personality, distributors, distributor, 360 feedback

Infographic: There's a Leadership Crisis Developing

Posted by Hogan Assessments on Wed, Feb 15, 2017

Before organizations can identify and develop high-potential employees, they have to define potential in a manner that works across all departments and job levels. And, in attempting to do so, many organizations end up with a complex concept of potential that satisfies no one. The Hogan High Potential Model is based on Leadership Foundations, Leadership Emergence, and Leadership Effectiveness. For more information, check out the infographic below or visit hoganhipo.com.

Click to view

Topics: high potential

Charisma Is Clogging Up Your Leadership Pipeline

Posted by Hogan Assessments on Thu, Feb 02, 2017

When it comes to who we want to work for, everyone thinks they want the same thing: a charismatic leader whose engaging personality and sweeping oratory inspires his or her followers to greatness, like every coach in every sports movie ever made, ever. Including this one by Al Pacino in Any Given Sunday.

Screen Shot 2017-01-18 at 3.10.23 PM.png

“Charisma has long prevailed as one of the most celebrated attributes of leadership,” Hogan CEO Dr. Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic wrote in a post in Fast Company. “A global survey evaluating everyday perceptions of leadership across 62 countries identified ‘charismatic’ and ‘inspirational’ as two of the most recurrent attributes linked to leadership.

For all it’s assumed importance, “There’s actually little evidence that charisma helps leaders be more effective,” Chamorro-Premuzic continued. “When leaders are charismatic but lack good judgment, vision, or the ability to build effective teams, they can be pretty destructive.”

Sound like anybody you know? If you’re like most organizations, your pipeline of high potential candidates is likely clogged with individuals matching this description. That’s because most organizations still rely on supervisor nominations (68.5%) and performance appraisals (74%) to identify potential in their talent pools. And, unfortunately, performance reviews and supervisor nominations tend to be good at identifying the people in an organization who “look” like leaders — individuals who seem smart, confident, charismatic, and who excel at self-promotion.

To be sure, these characteristics are critical to help individuals climb the corporate ladder. But they aren’t enough to succeed at the top, which is why 46% of leaders fail to meet business objectives in a new role.

How can you keep charismatic but ultimately unfit individuals out of your leadership pipeline? The reason most high potential programs struggle to produce viable high potential candidates is that they’re missing one thing: science. Hogan’s model of high potential is built on 30 years of independent research and validated on more than 21,000 global managers across every industry.

Want to know more? Check out our free ebook “The Politics of Potential” to read more about putting the Science of Personality to work in your high potential program.

 

Topics: leadership, high potential leaders, high potential, high potential employees, high potential program, charisma

Hogan Launches Innovative Global Training Program for 2017

Posted by Hogan Assessments on Thu, Jan 19, 2017

Level_2Hogan launched a new, innovative Global Learning Program for 2017 that aims to enable users to apply Hogan personality data toward solving real-world business problems.

With thousands of people across the globe certified to administer feedback for the Hogan assessment suite, the new program will offer a more robust and in-depth curriculum by revamping the Level I Certification Workshop and creating a new Level II Certification Workshop teaching more advanced interpretation and feedback skills.

“What we discovered through feedback from our clients is that they love learning about Hogan and the science behind our products,” says Jackie Sahm, Hogan’s Director of Global Learning. "However, we learned that our participants left our workshops wanting more, so we created additional learning programs to meet their needs. We believe it is our responsibility to deliver high-quality programs that prepare and inspire our learners to use our tools to make the world a better place to work.”

The standard rate for both levels taken consecutively will be $3,200 beginning January 1, 2017. Stand-alone pricing will be $2,300 for Level I and $1,200 for Level II. Hogan will pilot the new program in the US before implementing it abroad.

“We’re excited to get this new program underway,” says Sahm. “Our mission at Hogan has always been to leverage the science of personality to improve the global workforce, and it all starts with equipping Hogan users with the tools and knowledge necessary to accomplish that goal.”

For a detailed overview and list of 2017 Level I and Level II workshops, visit hogancertification.com.

Topics: certification

Potential Is Not Performance

Posted by Hogan Assessments on Wed, Jan 18, 2017

Identifying and developing high potentials — employees ready to take the leadership reins when someone gets promoted, steps down, or gets fired — is the single greatest talent management challenge organizations face today. The problem is, most organizations are really, really bad at it. Practitioners rate themselves as effective at identifying high potentials only about 50% of the time. That means many high-potential identification systems in place today could achieve the same level of accuracy by flipping a coin.

If your organization is like most, its high-potential identification program focuses — sometimes exclusively — on current performance. A recent survey found 74% of companies identify high-potential employees based on performance appraisals, and 68.5% based on recommendations from management. A separate study by Corporate Research Forum estimated that 73% of organizations currently identifying high potentials using one single data point — a rating or nomination by the individual’s direct supervisor.

“This is problematic for two reasons,” Hogan CEO Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic wrote in a post for Forbes. “First, organizations are not very good at measuring performance (once you eliminate subjective ratings, there are very few reliable metrics left). Second, even when they measure performance well, many top performers will fail to perform well at the next level.”

Performance measures tend to be subjective and biased by politics. Performance appraisals often reflect how much supervisors like their employees, and over-inflate ratings of actual job performance. As a result, individuals designated as high performers are often actually the best politicians, or what we call emergent leaders — the people who are great at building relationships, exerting social influence, and standing out enough to get ahead. The problem is that the qualities it takes to climb the corporate ladder aren’t enough to be effective as a leader.

Second, organizations tend to overestimate current performance as a predictor of future potential. The idea of leaning on performance reviews is that the best predictor of future performance is past performance. But as ClearCompany Co-founder Andre Lavoie points out in an article on Entrepreneur, although all high-potential employees are high performers, not all high-performing employees are high potentials. Research shows that only 30% of current high performers are actually high-potential employees, and most employees (more than 90%) would have trouble at the next level.

“When you transition employees from individual contributors to managers, or from managers to leaders, the pivotal qualities or competencies that drive high performance change,” Chamorro-Premuzic wrote. “Furthermore, many strong individual contributors are not even interested in managing or leading others, preferring instead to focus on independent problem-solving or being a team-player. The result is a paradoxical system that removes people from a job they are rather good at, and re-positions them in a role they are neither able nor willing to do.”

At the very least, wrongly designating a high performer as a high potential means you lose an excellent individual contributor. More than half of high-potential employees drop out of development programs or leave their employer within five years, and studies estimate losing a high-potential employee costs the organization 3.5 times his or her annual compensation.

At worst, promoting the wrong people can cause major engagement problems within your organization. Leadership directly impacts employee engagement. Good leadership creates engaged employees; bad leadership leaves employees alienated and demoralized. Engaged employees are energized, proud, enthusiastic, and have positive attitudes at work. Companies whose employees are engaged show higher returns on assets, are more profitable, and yield nearly twice the value to their shareholders compared to companies characterized by low employee engagement. Disengagement, on the other hand, results in an estimated $550 billion in lost productivity in the U.S. each year.

Put simply, performance is what you do. Potential is what you could do. Until organizations learn to differentiate between the two, it’s unlikely their success identifying high potential individuals will improve.

Want to know more about how to tell potential from performance? Check out our ebook, The Politics of Potential.

Topics: high potential leaders, performance, high potential, high potential employees, high potentials, high potential program, talent

Want to Learn More About High Potentials? We've Got You Covered.

Posted by Hogan Assessments on Thu, Jan 12, 2017

Leading up to the launch of the Hogan High Potential Talent Report, our CEO, Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic, authored numerous articles addressing human potential and how to assess it. Writing for Harvard Business Review, Fast Company, Forbes, and others, here’s a comprehensive list of Tomas’s articles on the subject.

Fast Company -- Tapping the Potential of Your Company's Hidden Superstars

Summary: Despite all the talk about the war for talent, most organizations already have the supply of talent they need. The problem is, many employers are unable to either identify or engage those high-potential individuals.

Harvard Business Review -- Strengths-Based Coaching Can Actually Weaken You

Summary: Although there are no reasons to expect the fascination with strengths-based coaching to wane any time soon, organizations – and people – would be better off it did. This article outlines five reasons to be skeptical of a leadership development approach that focuses only on strengths.

Fast Company -- How to Get Your Employer to Finally Recognize Your Potential

Summary: It’s the job of every manager to size up their team members and evaluate their potential. That means understanding not just their current talents, but also their likelihood of developing them for higher-impact roles.

Management Today -- 5 Tips for Assessing Employee Potential

Summary: In an ideal world, your pipeline would be brimming with future high fliers, who will one day push your organization to new heights. Unfortunately, life’s rarely that kind. Here are five tips to help you find and develop your future stars.

Harvard Business Review -- What Science Tells Us About Leadership Potential    

Summary: Although the scientific study of leadership is well established, its key discoveries are unfamiliar to most people, including an alarmingly large proportion of those in charge of evaluating and selecting leaders.

Huffington Post -- Why Many Companies Are Failing to Unlock Their Future Leaders' Potential

Summary: It’s unsurprising that organizations devote an increasing amount of time and resources to the identification and development of future leaders. This explains the recent proliferation of interventions targeting HIPOs: the individuals who show the biggest promise for leading the organization in the future.

Forbes -- Four Things You Probably Didn't Know About High Potential Employees

Summary: There are four common mistakes organizations tend to make in their HIPO programs, namely mistaking performance for potential, and emergence for effectiveness; undermining the importance of development, and ignoring the dark side of personality.

Fast Company -- Three Reasons Why You Aren't Reaching Your Full Potential

Summary: “Inborn talent” is something of an oxymoron. Nobody is born with talent, as we typically understand the term, and we all differ in our potential to develop the skills and attributes that later lead others to call us talented. So why are some people better at developing their potential than others?

Fast Company -- What You Think Makes a Good Leader Probably Doesn't

Summary: We may think we know what qualities we value in those who lead us – and why – but companies and entire countries keep pushing less than stellar leaders into positions of power. How come? 

Fast Company -- The Often Overlooked Aspect of Getting Ahead at Work

Summary: Managing the tension between getting along and getting ahead is particularly important if you have leadership aspirations. Psychologist Robert Hogan defined leadership as “getting along to get ahead,” and he put forward a Darwinian framework for understanding why some people are more successful than others.

Fast Company -- How We Can See Past the Allure of Charismatic Leaders

Summary: A global survey evaluating everyday perceptions of leadership across 62 countries identified “charismatic” and “inspirational” as two of the most recurrent attributes linked to leadership. Yet there’s actually little evidence that charisma helps leaders be more effective. In fact, it often has the reverse effect.

Fast Company -- How to Turn Your Personality into You Career Advantage

Summary: With a bit of self-awareness – understanding how you differ from others and especially what others think of you – you can turn your personality from a heavy roadblock to a killer career weapon.

Harvard Business Review -- Talent Matters Even More than People Think

Summary: Clearly, some people are both talented and hard-working, but there is often a tension between the two. Talent can make people lazy because they need to rely less on hard work to achieve the same goal. Hard work helps people compensate for lower levels of talent, which is why it’s quite helpful to be aware of one’s limitations. But how much does talent really matter?

Management Today -- Do Nice Managers Finish Last?

Summary: In the corporate world, most organizations seem to have developed – involuntarily, of course – quite effective mechanisms for stopping nice employees from advancing to management positions.

Forbes -- Can Human Potential Be Measured? A Psychological View

Summary: The idea that science can be used to quantify our future performance is unpopular. The main reason is that it tastes of determinism and questions the strong lay conviction that we are completely free to decide our destiny, a conviction that is obviously irrational.

For more information about the Hogan High Potential Talent Report, visit hoganhipo.com.

Topics: high potential leaders, high potential, high potential employees, high potentials, high potential program

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